Asahi Brewery Tour – Free Beer in Japan


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Once the Toyota factory tour was done and dusted, we hopped on another train and headed directly to Moriyama for the Asahi Brewery Tour. The Tour is offered in Japanese and English and it appeared that there were only Japanese tours available now. But the language of beer is universal right?

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The tour is free and comes complete with a tasting, which is also free.  We arrived were checked in and sat waiting.  It turns out there was room on the English tour after all.  So wee spent a pleasant 30 minutes walking around the brewery area, with a great, but nervous guide. This was just her second tour.

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The tour takes you through how beer is made, detailing the raw ingredients, to the process itself. Then you walk around the outside of the storage bins.  You then head inside, looking down on all the (sadly mostly stationary) equipment, past filling and bottling production lines.

We learn that the uniforms of the girls who give the tours are made of recycled plastic and of Asahi’s commitment to the environment. We find the smallest beer bottles that we’ve seen.  I wonder why what looks like just a mouthful of beer would sell that well and then we head to the tasting hall.

Our free tour comes with a free 40 minute tasting. We get three free beers and some snacks.  There’s also a special offer for today, whiskey and some fruit wine. But we only have 40 minutes.

For a guide to the World’s Best Beer Snacks – check out our collaborative article – where you can also find out what snacks you should be eating with your Asahi.

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I’ve been traveling now for 6 months and have been nursing my drinks, when we’ve had them, to make them last in an attempt to stick to the budget.

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And now I have to neck them.

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It’s hard work drinking beer fast, but we give it a good shot!

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Oh and then we try the fruit wine. And the whisky. And we leave in a pleasant alcoholic haze heading in search of something to soak up all this booze.
En route to the train station we complete the lifecycle of rice.  There were rice terraces in China, in Vietnam, and now finally the rice is being harvested, right here on the side of a street in Moriyama.

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About Sarah Carter

Sarah Carter is an avid reader, writer and traveller. She loves hiking, sailing, skiing and exploring the world through food. She left a successful career in IT security and compliance in both the UK and US to travel the world with husband and partner in adventure, Nigel.

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